How to Meditate When You Think You Can’t

Woman Who Meditates

Meditation is a powerful practice that is good for both your brain and body. And, just like Fit Brains, you can do it for just 1 to 2 minutes anywhere, anytime with immediate benefits. So it’s a no-brainer that we should all do it.

Meditation 101 ‘Ommm’

1. Pick a general time

Meditate to start off your day but if you are too rushed in the morning, any time that’s convenient is fine. Just try to pick a time that you can do daily so it becomes easier to make it a habit.

2. Find a quiet spot

It can be your bed, a bench on a park or the beach.

3. Get into a comfortable position

Either sit or lie down. Don’t slouch. The ‘Savasana’ aka dead corpse pose in yoga is a great one, lie down with your palms facing up.

4. Keep your eyes open & soft

Focus your eyes on one spot and soften your eyes. If you have trouble concentrating, you can shut your eyes.

5. Focus on your breathing

Clear you mind of all thoughts. Follow the natural flow of your breath from your nose all the way down to your lungs. Notice how your chest, rib cage, shoulders and belly ebb and flow with each breath. If you start getting distracted (and you will), gently re-focus back on your breath. If you still can’t focus, then count to 5 while focusing on your breath. Don’t worry, in the beginning you may have thoughts flittering in and out of your mind or you may even fall asleep! Keep at it!

6. Do this for 1 to 2 minutes daily

Once you master meditating for a few minutes, increase the number of minutes the next week.

Namaste! Congratulations you’ve mastered your inner yogi. Now why not challenge your brain further?

Delight & Challenge Your Brain

Fit Brains Fun Brain GamesFit Brains is easy to pick up and hard to put down. With over 60+ games, we have the most and the widest variety of games on the market.

PLAY TODAY

The Fit Brains Team

“Brain Training Success”

Meditate Your Way to a Happier Brain with Less Anxiety!

girl doing yoga pose on beach during sunset

December.  It’s a month of family get-togethers, gifts, shopping, and let’s face it, that usually comes with a heightened feeling of anxiety.  It’s a wonderful time of the year, but it’s hardly a month that we associate with rest and relaxation.  During this busy month it’s important to remember that your brain needs balance and inner peace to keep it functioning at it’s best.  While it’s good to actively “exercise” your brain, just like your body, your brain also needs periods of rest in order to recharge.  This is because chronic stress is bad for the health of your brain, and peace and quiet helps reduce stress and anxiety.      

Neuroscientists are now exploring both religious and non-religious forms of spirituality and how they affect the brain.  Practicing meditation can help reduce depression, anxiety and stress, and researchers at the Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia found that meditation can even specifically improve memory and concentration (Blumberg, 2014).

In addition to spiritual practices such as meditation, here are some other top tips to ease anxiety and find that inner peace and balance that your brain needs.

  • Engage in daily prayer and/or practice complete forgiveness
  • Engage in deep breathing (5 min. 3 times daily)
  • Focus on and repeat positive ideas
  • Practice yoga
  • Engage in progressive muscle relaxation daily for 10 minutes (it’s pretty simple. First you deliberately tense your muscles and then simply relax them)
  • Muscle relaxation is even more effective if you pair it with visualization and imagery techniques! (create a mental image of a peaceful or attractive environment)
  • Give yourself 30 minutes a day to just stop and be at rest
  • Play Fit Brains Emotional Intelligence games that are designed to help you assess your mood and put you in a positive state of mind.

What are your favorite techniques for reducing stress and anxiety during this busy time of the year?  Share your comments with us!

Fit Brains. Brain Training Success.

Simple Ways to Improve Your Healthy Brain Lifestyle

  • To reduce unhealthy stress levels, take up yoga, meditate, laugh, exercise, or care for a pet.
  • The easiest way to challenge your brain is to choose a “word of the day” and then work the word into a conversation.  Improving vocabulary is a great way to challenge your brain daily.
  • Ten minutes of focusing on the positive and visualizing the future each day can change the way you look at life, opening your mind to new possibilities.
  • Take advantage of your natural learning booster by believing something is important. If we try to learn without feeling interested, very little of that information will be saved in our memories. When we tell ourselves that what we’re learning is important, our brains join in, triggering our learning circuits.
  • Try making a list of ten things you are thankful for – just doing this daily can make a big difference in your everyday attitude and help manage stress. There is a definite connection between healthy living and having a positive outlook on life.

Click here for more tips to encourage a Healthy Brain Lifestyle…

Spirituality and Brain Health

Spirituality has many meanings and it may mean something different to different people. I am  referring to spirituality as one means of turning inward to a peaceful existence and to remove oneself from the hurried society that is modern life.  Prayer/worship, meditation, and relaxation procedures are just three examples of spirituality.

Early research on the human brain exposed to life threatening stressors indicates there is similar damage to the hippocampus as is known to exist in animals. Also, humans with chronic anxiety have memory problems again supporting the negative effect of stress and uncontrolled anxiety on brain function.

Research and surveys have reported the following positive effects of spirituality on health:

  • An enhanced immune system, the system that helps you defend against colds, flu, and other illnesses.
    Reports of longer, happier and healthier lives.
  • As part of the daily routine while in the hospital relates to an earlier discharge.
  • According to a past Parade Magazine Survey, 95% of the physicians in the U.S. believe spirituality is   important to the well-being of their patients.

to learn more about more about Spirituality and Brain Health

God and the Human Brain

It is very hard not to appreciate the necessity of a higher being to the creation and existence of the human brain. Scientists have recently increased study of the relationship between a higher being, God, and the human brain. Why do patients with temporal lobe epilepsy or schizophrenia sometimes report hyper-religiosity, delusions of grandeur, and belief that they are God? Is there something about the Temporal Lobe and appreciation of God?

New research (see March Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) suggests that our own belief systems regarding God trigger different parts of the human brain. It appears that we use our cortex and higher order processing systems to think about God’s thoughts or emotions or even the metaphorical aspects of God or religion.

Of interest is the field of Neurotheology that studies the relationship between our belief systems and brain function. We most likely need to pay more attention to how religious beliefs and practices may help to promote quality of life and then integrate such practices into our standard prescribed health care therapies. For example, even in a brain ravaged with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) the person can sit still and appropriately for nearly 30 minutes to hear a religious service or mass, to sing religious hymns, and to pray. This activity soothes the agitated brain in ways some, if not most, medications do not.