Announcement: Rosetta Stone Acquires Fit Brains!


BIG news today!  We are joining the Rosetta Stone family!

It has been announced today that Rosetta Stone has acquired Vivity Labs, Inc. (creator of Fit Brains’ successful portfolio of brain training products).  The close connection between language learning and brain training makes our company a natural strategic fit for Rosetta Stone, which is continuing its rapid expansion beyond language learning and into adjacent categories of technology-driven education.

The rapid expansion of the brain fitness category underscores a new public desire for maintaining and enhancing cognitive health. According to a 2012 study by SharpBrains, a research firm that tracks the sector, the market for brain health software grew from $295 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than $480 million at the end of last year. Experts estimate that the market will exceed $3 billion by 2020. With the support of Rosetta Stone’s revered brand and global distribution network, we anticipate an exciting new phase of growth for Fit Brains!

We can’t wait to start working with Rosetta Stone & continue to build great brain training & educational products for you!

Read more about the acquisition by clicking here

Download Fit Brains apps by clicking here

Find out more about Rosetta Stone by clicking here

New App for Kids – Fit Brains: Sparky’s Adventures!

You asked for it, and now we delivered…

Our newest iOS brain training app for kids has launched!  Fit Brains: Sparky’s Adventures is now available for download on iPhones and iPads at the iTunes store.

Fit Brains: Sparky’s Adventures offers a first-of-its-kind approach to child learning and development. With a library of 200+ fun & healthy brain games designed for children ages 2 to 8, this app will stimulate the 5 key areas of your child’s brain and automatically adapts to the specific needs of your child.


  1. 200+ games for your child that are both fun and educational
  2. Each game stimulates a key area of the brain: Memory, Concentration (Attention), Problem-Solving, Speed, Visual
  3. Automatic adjustment of game difficulty to match your child’s skill level and continuing growth
  4. Rewarded treats that can be added to the “playground” to keep your child engaged and motivated
  5. The “Parents Corner” offers detailed tools & charts tracking your child’s progress in different areas
  6. A “Fit Brains Age Index” to show which age group your child is performing the closest to

Benefits for your Child:

  • Stimulate brain processing
  • Decrease boredom & increase educational fun!

In the Media:

The original Fit Brains Trainer has been highly successful, used and praised by people all over the world.  However, we have gotten many requests for additional tools & products and we knew we had to start expanding our training to the entire family.  We saw the lack of a comprehensive brain trainer for young children, and heard from many of our fans that they wanted a Fit Brains app geared toward their kids.  It was here that Fit Brains: Sparky’s Adventures was born.

We hope this new app will bring education into playtime fun for your children.  Leave us a comment below and let us know your child’s experience with the app!


8 Tips & Tricks To Help You Remember Everyday Things!

“Where did I leave my keys?”
“What am I forgetting to buy?”
“What time is that meeting?”
“He just introduced himself a minute ago…and I already forgot his name.”

We all have those moments when our memory fails us on the seemingly simplest daily tasks and items to remember.  Although the occasional memory loss is probably inevitable, there are ways we can reduce the number of “blank out” moments in our lives.  Try using these 8 easy tricks to improve your memory for those small things in life!

1. Pay attention – Give the item you know you will need to remember your full, undivided attention when you first input it into your brain.  For example, listen to the introduction being given to you instead of worrying about what you need to say after, or take some time to think about everything you need to buy before you leave your home. 

2. Repeat it– With everything you need to remember, use a minute or two to repeat it over and over in your mind.  This works for locations, people, inanimate objects, exam notes…anything you want to stick and stay in your brain.

3. Use your senses – When you forget something, use all of your senses to try to remember it.  For example, if you forget where your first date with your significant other was, try to think about the things you touched, tasted, felt, smelled, saw, etc.  It is very likely one of these sensory cues will help you remember.

4. Associate it– Use random associations that make sense to you when you need to remember something.  

  • Rhymes: The new guy at work called Stan goes to the beach a lot = Tan Stan.
  • Mnemonics: I need to buy Beef, Ricotta cheese, Apples, Nuts, Donuts from the grocery store today = B.R.A.N.D
  • Personal links: I always leave my keys on the table below the family portrait = name your keys “Family Keys”


5. Create a routine – If you need to remember something on a continuous basis, like locking the door or feeding a pet, make it a routine.  Create a schedule and do the task at the exact same time in the exact same way every time you need to do it. 

6. Take a break – Sometimes you need to rest your brain a little before you put it to work again.  Even if something is at the tip of your tongue, overusing your brain will likely make you begin to doubt or confuse yourself.
7.  Write it down – When you have too many things to remember at once, just write it down!  The easiest way to “remember” is to make a concrete note.  Use sticky notes, mobile device reminders, voice recordings, etc. 

8. Play Fit Brains Trainer – Our app exercises stimulate your Memory, Processing Speed, Concentration, Problem-Solving, and Visual skills.  Fit Brains Trainer keeps your mind challenged so CLICK HERE to download the app now!

Leave a comment & let us know the tips and tricks you use to remember everyday things!


Words Sculpt the Brain

Neuroscience has underscored the importance of neural plasticity and this has unleashed an entire new way of thinking about the human brain. Indeed, we now know more about the brain than ever in our civilization, and most of the knowledge has been accrued in the past twenty years.

Plasticity enables a brain to be shaped by environmental input and it presumes a constantly reorganizing and malleable system. The brain is constantly being shaped, some for the positive and some for the negative. The good news is we have plenty of opportunity to make good decisions regarding how we want our brains to be shaped.

My brain health lifestyle ® promotes five major components to shaping the brain. These include physical activity, mental stimulation, nutrition, socialization, and spirituality. I have promoted an enriched environment filled with novel and complex stimuli as one that can shape the brain for the health.

I believe another major source of shaping or sculpting our brains is language. The spoken language and words themselves. Words are processed by the brain and interpreted for meaning. Such processing creates or leads to thought, emotion, and movement. I have written and spoken about the long-term effects words can have on a human brain and human being.

Consider for a moment some of the most important and wise statements or pieces of advice you have been given or you have read in your life. The very words made a lasting impression, perhaps emotional or cognitive, and literally sculpted your brain in a positive way. This is all neurophysiological and structural in nature, but it results in a behavioral or functional outcome. You might also recall an insult or a negative piece of feedback that affected you in a negative manner. The sculpting here is no less significant and carries with it the same potential for long-term effects.

Grandmother was correct and wise when she instructed to “not open our mouths unless we had something good to say”!

The messages we deliver in the form of words can carry a significant and long lasting effect. We can start and stop wars, start and stop relationships, help others succeed in life, and make others feel good about themselves.

Words, a pretty cool medicine indeed!

Awareness in Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of progressive dementia in the United States accounting for 95% of all dementias. It is believed that approximately 5 million Americans suffer AD and that this number will nearly triple in the next 40 years. AD is also on the increase worldwide.

AD is a progressive dementia that affects functions of memory, language, spatial skill, personality and functional ability. The disease continues to erode these functions rendering the patient completely dependent. It is generally believed that patients with more advanced AD are not aware of their condition and do not have an awareness of the people or places around them.

New research on awareness in those with vegetative state suggests this may not be true. Communication may also be possible for those in vegetative state. One case of a 29 year-old patient in a vegetative state was able to answer yes no questions by visualizing specific scenes the doctors asked him to imagine. The brain yielded different activity when different scenes were viewed. This particular patient was in a vegetative state for five years.

This new study published in the online version of the New England Journal of Medicine supports previous cases of awareness in those with vegetative state and raises significant issues concerning understanding of brain function and ethical matters dealing with end of life decisions.

Another suspicion this raises for me is whether a patient with advanced Alzheimer’s disease maintains some awareness of his surroundings. Perhaps the patient’s smile or blink to a family member has more meaning than we previously believed. It is not unreasonable to believe that the complexity of the human brain will not permit complete disconnect from those persons or things that are most important to that brain. We may simply not yet have the ability to measure such activity.

The new study reported in the online New England Journal of Medicine will help to spur research into this and other questions. We are on the frontier of an entirely new understanding of the human brain and we will be very surprised by how we have underestimated its ability and power. I refer to this new exploration of human brain potential as “neural energies.”