Brain Hacks To Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions

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As the end of January looms around the corner, will you be one of the 58% of people who will stick to their New Year’s resolutions after the first month? According to the Statistic Brain Research Institute, more 90% of us break them. It’s not just in North American where resolutions fail but it happens all across the world, thousands of resolutions are broken every year.  

Why is that and how can you beat the insurmountable odds?

Most of us find it difficult to stick to resolutions because we need willpower. And, we only have a finite amount of it as it gets used up throughout the day. Think about all the choices you have to make: salad or chocolate, drink or run and so on. A study conducted by Stanford University divided a group of undergraduates students into those who had to remember a 2 digit number and those who had to remember a 7 digit one. And, then, they had to take a quick walk and they were given a choice between cake or fruit. Can you guess the results? The ones who had to remember the shorter number were half as likely to choose the cake.

So wait. How does this knowledge help with resolutions? Willpower is like a muscle, the more you use it, the stronger you use it. Keeping this in mind, here are some ways to hack your brain to maintain your resolutions:

1. Choose Just 1 Goal

Don’t overwhelm your brain. Choose the one thing that you want to change the most. For example, I’ll challenge my brain by playing Fit Brains’ games.

2. K.I.S.S Keep It Simple 

Break down the resolution into one easy, small task. Then, it will be more simple for you to make it a habit. It typically takes 45 days to create a habit. So, if we use the example above, a simple task could be I’ll play Fit Brains’ games for just 5 minutes per day. And, here’s a bonus, our games are fun which leads to our third tip.

3. Make It Fun

You’re more likely to stick to your goal if you enjoy doing it.  Think of ways to make your change as fun as possible.

3. Make Yourself Accountable

Write it down and/or tell your friends, family and colleagues. There is mounting proof that your social group can significantly affect your behavior. So you can use your social network to receive positive support.

4. Focus On Your Wins

Give yourself rewards and positive feedback to improve your likelihood of success. Research by the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, published recently in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, reveals that immediate rewards are strongly linked to achieving a long term goal. And, you know what else? The study found that immediate rewards were more effective than long-term delayed ones.

It’s not too late to make a resolution or to create a new one! If you think about it, is there anything more important than challenging your brain? Make 2017 your best year yet! Fit Brains’ games challenges all areas of your brain including memory, logic, concentration, visual-spatial and speed of thinking. Plus, we’re the only brain trainer that challenges both cognitive and emotional intelligence. If that’s not enough to convince you, we have the most and widest variety of fun smart games on the market.

The best part?  You can get started now with a Fit Brains Free Trial!

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And, follow us throughout the year to learn more about brain health and brain training.  Commit to you in 2017!

Fit Brains

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The Best in Brain News: January Digest

Fit Brains Monthly Brain Digest

Happy New Year! Wishing you health, happiness and success in 2017! Read about current brain news and leading brain research in our latest monthly brain digest.

Brain Science: Why Your Brain Makes New Year’s Resolutions So Difficult to Stick To and Ways to Work Around It

Did you make a New Year’s resolution this year? Less than 10% of Americans usually stick to their resolutions. Learn why and how you can rewire your brain for success. Discover the secret to keeping your resolution now!

Brain Research: Recent Study Shows Runners Have Stronger Brain Connections Which Helps Brain Function

Are you considering running as one of your 2017 resolutions? A study by researchers at the University of Arizona may convince you! They found that running helps brain function, especially those involving complex cognitive skills like planning, problem solving and multitasking. The scientists also believe that these benefits would also help cognitive function later in life. Read more about this interesting study then why not go for a quick run today!

Brain Psychology: The Way Complaining Sets Your Brain Up For Negativity

Did you know that most people complain once a minute during a typical conversation? And, due to the wiring in your brain, the more you repeat a behaviour, the more easier it is to do? It’s the phenonmenon known as “neurons that fire together, wire together”. Complaining has negative effects on your brain and health. In fact, studies show that negative thoughts shrink the brain. Learn 4 easy methods to stop complaining and add it to your resolutions list!

Brain & Emotional Intelligence (EQ): Top Reasons Why EQ Is Increasingly Becoming A Top Job Skill  

Emotional intelligence (EQ), by 2020 will be one of the top 10 job skills according to the World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs Report. EI has increasingly become more important in the workplace. It is a key factor for job hires, promotions and salary increases. Learn more about the importance of EQ and try one of our EQ games today. We’re the only brain trainer that challenges both cognitive and emotional intelligence.

Challenge Your Brain! Fit Brains offers fun smart games for your mind.

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THE FIT BRAINS TEAM

“Brain Training Success”

The Best in Brain News: December Digest

Fit Brains Monthly Brain Digest & Brain News

Read about current brain news and leading brain research in our latest monthly brain digest.

More Proof That Brain Training Helps Combat Dementia

Findings from an Australian study indicates that brain training can enhance memory and mood in older adults who suffer from mild cognitive impairment. Discover their findings!

Brain Training Games Help Lower ‘Chemobrain’ Issues

Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered that brain training games involving focus, memory and visual abilities lower chemotherapy-induced neurological issues (“chemofog” or “chemobrain”) in cancer patients. Read more about their fascinating study.

Is It Better for Your Brain to Give Than Receive?

Does holiday gift shopping stress you out? Take heart, the act of giving is good for your brain and your overall life expectancy! Countless studies indicate that the act of giving is good for your brain, mood, health and overall longevity. Find out why and get into the holiday spirit!

Christmas Spirit & Your Brain!

Are you one of those people who can’t wait to put up Christmas decorations right after Thanksgiving? Or are you a Scrooge? Scientists have discovered that people who like Christmas have different brain activity than those who ‘bah humbug’ during the holidays. Their research is preliminary but they hope there might be a cure for all Scrooges one day. Read this festive brain news and get your holiday cheer on!

Challenge Your Brain! Fit Brains offers fun smart games for your mind.

TRY A FREE FUN GAME TODAY

THE FIT BRAINS TEAM

“Brain Training Success”

 

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month – 3 Brain Facts You Should Know

Senior couple sitting on beach
Here’s to a Healthy, Happy Brain!

It’s National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and National Family Caregivers Month! We thank the 15 million+ Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers in America.

What is Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, kills brain cells and interferes with cognitive abilities, emotions, behaviour and physical skills. It’s not a regular part of aging. And it’s a progressively debilitating disease that leads to death.

The Numbers

Did you know 47 million people worldwide and 5.3 million Americans have Alzheimer’s? Every 67 seconds an American develops this disease. Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the US. It can’t be cured or slowed unlike the other 9 leading causes of death. And two-thirds of Alzheimer’s patients are women.

But There Is Hope

Even though there isn’t a cure, drugs and certain actions can manage the disease. Also, research shows that lifestyle factors and a positive outlook can help with brain aging. Recent UK study results conducted by the BBC, Alzheimer’s Society and the Medical Research Council indicate that regular brain training can benefit people over the age of 50. Findings from another well known study reveal that adults who learn new skills and do mentally stimulating activities like crosswords usually have lower rates of dementia. The notable Nun study indicates that an optimistic mind provides a natural defence against Alzheimer’s. And, here’s a twist, even though some nuns actually had the disease, they showed no outward symptoms, thanks to keeping their brains active and positive! Brain training can help maintain brain function and help prevent cognitive decline.

Quick Tips to Maintain Brain Function and Prevent Cognitive Decline

  1.     Hit the Gym
  2.     Nosh on a Healthy Diet
  3.     As Pharrel Williams Sings, Be Happy!
  4.     Challenge Your Mind with our fun free games! [hyperlink]

What is your favorite activity to boost your brain?  Tell us in the comments!  And follow our blog for more lifestyle & health tips.  

Play a FREE Fun Brain Game Now

The Fit Brains Team

“Brain Training Success”

Brain Train Your Way to Better Performance: The FINGER Study

According to a recent study published in the journal The Lancet (March 2015) brain training, exercise, healthy eating and management of risk factors seems to maintain or improve cognitive function and delay cognitive decline.  The Finnish Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) is the first of its’ kind, ground breaking trial to combat some of the key high risk factors for dementia (eg. Heart health, high BMI).

Method

1260 Finns aged 60-77 were randomly divided equally between the control group who were given general health tips and the intervention group.  The latter had regular meetings with healthcare professionals and were given comprehensive guidance on healthy eating, exercise programs, brain training and managing metabolic and vascular risk factors, for example, with regular blood exams.

Findings

After 2 years, the participants’ cognitive performance was assessed with a standard exam, the Neuropsychological Test Battery (NTB).  The overall scores for the intervention group were higher by 25%.  The remarkable results for certain sections of the exam, processing speed at 150% and executive functioning at 83% were even higher.  Executive function refers to the brain’s capacity to manage, plan and execute thought processes.

“Much previous research has shown that there are links between cognitive decline in older people and factors such as diet, heart health, and fitness. However, our study is the first large randomised controlled trial to show that an intensive program aimed at addressing these risk factors might be able to prevent cognitive decline in elderly people who are at risk of dementia.” Professor Kivipelto, lead Researcher – Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki, and University of Eastern Finland

Train & Play with Fit Brains

Your brain is like a muscle, it can grow fitter and stronger with exercise. Train and play with Fit Brains. Fit Brains exercises help stimulate and entertain your mind. You can play Fit Brains on any web browser or train or train on-the-go with our IOS, Android or Amazon app!   

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Journal Reference

Tiia Ngandu, Jenni Lehtisalo, Alina Solomon, Esko Levälahti, Satu Ahtiluoto, Riitta Antikainen, Lars Bäckman, Tuomo Hänninen, Antti Jula, Tiina Laatikainen, Jaana Lindström, Francesca Mangialasche, Teemu Paajanen, Satu Pajala, Markku Peltonen, Rainer Rauramaa, Anna Stigsdotter-Neely, Timo Strandberg, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Hilkka Soininen, Miia Kivipelto. A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trialThe Lancet, 2015; DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60461-5